Past Projects

Western Canada          The Prairies          The North          Ontario          Eastern Canada          National

Western Canada

Woodland Caribou
2016/17

In the past, caribou could be found across two-thirds of Alberta, but suffered a major population decline in the early 1970’s, from which they never recovered. Current population estimates of woodland caribou in the province are just 2,500 to 4,200 individuals. In order to ensure their population survives and grows, Earth Rangers and the Pembina Institute collaborated to help identify caribou habitat and propose conservation areas across Northern Alberta.

 

Western Screech Owl
2014/15

Fewer than 500 western screech owls are left in Canada. Key threats to their population include forest habitat loss due to development, large-scale agriculture and hydroelectric projects. Earth Rangers teamed up with the Nature Conservancy of Canada to protect western screech owls by collecting important information about population size and studying their nesting habits. Thanks to the donations raised for this Bring Back the Wild project, the Nature Conservancy of Canada was able to conduct over 90 surveys. The information from these surveys will be used to support conservation efforts for western screech owls.

 

Oregon Spotted Frog
2012/13

Oregon spotted frogs are the most endangered amphibians in Canada; within their limited range in southwestern British Columbia fewer than 300 breeding females remain. This drastic population decline is caused by such threats as habitat loss and the presence of invasive species, like bull frogs. To help protect the Oregon spotted frog Earth Rangers and the Vancouver Aquarium worked together to reintroduce this species into protected habitat and raise awareness about amphibians at risk. Over 5,000 Earth Rangers members started fundraising campaigns to help protect the Oregon spotted frog, helping to build a new breeding facility on the roof of the Vancouver Aquarium, supporting the breeding and release of Oregon spotted frogs into the wild, and restoring wetland habitat in eastern Fraser Valley in Aldergrove National Park.

 

Grizzly Bear
2010/11

The beautiful Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia is targeted for development, which would destroy the homes for many species including the grizzly bear. That’s why Earth Rangers and the Nature Conservancy of Canada teamed up to protect this habitat. The funds Earth Rangers members raised through Bring Back the Wild went to buy private land to protect this habitat and keep air traffic and other disturbances away. By protecting land in Ellerslie Creek in the Great Bear Rainforest, we helped provide critical habitat for grizzly bears and tons of other species like black bears, mountain goats, cougars and gray wolves.

 

Wolverine
2010/11

Earth Rangers and the Nature Conservancy of Canada purchased land in Alberta’s Crowsnest Pass to help protect wolverines and other local animals. Wolverines are wide-ranging carnivores that need space to roam. Increasingly major roads are cutting off their migratory routes; their populations are also susceptible to fur-trappers. Through purchasing land, Earth Rangers and the Nature Conservancy of Canada helped expand the protected habitat that provides safe spaces for such species as the wolverine, grizzly bear, grey wolf and elk. Thousands of Earth Rangers members started Bring Back the Wild campaigns to provide support for this conservation project while raising awareness about species at risk.

 

The Prairies

Pine Marten
2016/17

To ensure that pine martens continue to have a safe place to call home, Earth Rangers supported TNC Canada as they collaborated with local First Nations communities, the Manitoba Government and industry to develop a land-use plan within 22 million acres of boreal forest. The land-use planning process is developed and defined by First Nations communities, and involves scientific research, GIS mapping, Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge and extensive community engagement. All parties are working together to have the land-use plans formally adopted.

 

Swift Fox
2014/15

As little as 35 years ago there were no swift foxes left in the wild in Canada. Today, thanks to a lot of hard work, their populations are returning. Unfortunately, they are still listed as threatened in Canada as they face serious threats like grassland habitat loss, as well as trapping and hunting. Earth Rangers and the Calgary Zoo helped protect the swift fox by purchasing cameras that researchers use to study the habitats where these foxes raise their young. This information will be used to find better ways to protect swift foxes and the habitats where they grow up.

 

Western Bumble Bee
2013/14

Bees are disappearing fast, and we need more scientific research to figure out how we can help them. Habitat loss, disease and pests, pesticides, invasive species and climate change are all making it difficult for these important pollinators to thrive. Earth Rangers and Dr. Cory Sheffield from the Royal Saskatchewan Museum helped protect the western bumble bee by funding research to better understand bees and learn more about the number and variety of bees in western Canada. This conservation project also created awareness about the vital role bees play.

 

Monarch Butterfly
2011/12

Monarch butterflies are beautiful insects known for their incredible migratory journey that takes them almost 5,000 kilometers. Sadly, environmental conditions and loss of breeding habitat pose serious threats to the Monarch. Widespread use of herbicide in North America kills Milkweed, a plant that provides food for the Monarch caterpillars and nectar for the butterflies. To help protect the Monarch butterfly Earth Rangers and the Nature Conservancy of Canada preserved critical habitat in the Tall Grass Prairie in Manitoba. This area is filled with Milkweed and wildflowers, providing a large open habitat for Monarchs and other at-risk species.

 

Plains Bison
2011/12

The plains bison once roamed the western prairies in the millions, but by the late 1800s they had been hunted to near extinction. Today their populations continue to recover, that’s why Earth Rangers and the Nature Conservancy of Canada helped care for plains bison at Old Man on His Back Prairie and Heritage Conservation Area in Saskatchewan. Thousands of Earth Ranger kids started Bring Back the Wild Campaigns to purchase hay to feed the bison during the winter months when snow cover prevents them from grazing. Donations also funded site maintenance, such as fixing fences.

 

The North

Cold-Water Coral
2015/16

Cold water coral thrive in the deep waters of the Arctic and provide critical habitat for juvenile Greenland halibut and a variety of other fish and crustaceans, which are important food sources for a diverse group of marine mammals, including narwhal. Estimated to be 8,000-9,000 years old, Canada’s cold water corals are currently facing major threats like resource exploration and development, climate change, ocean acidification and bottom trawling. To learn more about the location of cold water corals in areas that have never been surveyed, Earth Rangers is working with Arctic Fishery Alliance to conduct surveys using a remote controlled underwater camera in the Davis Strait, Baffin Bay, and The Mouth of Eclipse Sound, where the Arctic Ocean meets the Atlantic. These surveys will provide a greater understanding of where cold water corals are found in order to inform better protection for them.

 

Beluga Whale
2013/14

The early melting of arctic sea ice means more ships are travelling through the arctic than ever before. Scientists believe that noise pollution from these ships may be affecting the beluga’s ability to communicate with one another, find food, raise their young and detect predators. Earth Rangers, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, the University of Manitoba and Churchill Northern Studies Centre helped protect the beluga whale by purchasing special underwater recorders to measure the effects of boat noise on their natural behaviours. This project also supported conservation research and helped scientists study how environmental changes, like contaminants, affect beluga whale health.

 

Polar Bear
2012/13

Since the early 1980s the conditions for polar bears in their arctic habitat has declined, largely due to climate change. The sea ice is breaking up earlier than normal and decreasing in coverage, which forces polar bears inland sooner in the year. Earth Rangers, the Churchill Northern Studies Centre and researcher Dr. Nick Lunn worked together to protect the polar bear by supporting scientists conducting research in western Hudson Bay. This project also purchased satellite collars that allowed researchers to track polar bears and learn more about how early melting sea ice impacts their offshore movement and survival. 22,000 Earth Rangers members started Bring Back the Wild campaigns to help protect polar bears; their efforts raised awareness about species at risk while providing support for critical polar bear research.

 

Ontario

Eastern Small-footed Bat
2016/17

The rarity of eastern small-footed bats has led to a lack of knowledge about their habitat, making conservation planning challenging. In an effort to learn more about this species, Earth Rangers teamed up with Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) to find eastern small-footed bat roosting sites and identify areas for us to protect. This important study not only contributed to identifying and monitoring the endangered Ontario population of eastern small-footed bats; it also provided other bat researchers with an inventory of locations that will be the basis for future studies of this species in Ontario. This includes the important task of stopping the spread of white-nose syndrome in Canada, a deadly fungus that has not yet been identified in Ontario eastern small-footed bats but that is rampant in populations across the United States.

 

Midland Painted Turtle
2016/17

One of the biggest threats facing turtles in Ontario is the destruction of wetland habitat across the southern part of the province. In order to ensure the Midland Painted Turtle and others, including the Snapping Turtle, continue to have a safe place to live in southern Ontario, Earth Rangers and the City of Toronto have collaborated on a major wetland restoration project, focused on an area called Habitat Pond, on Toronto Island. The Habitat Pond restoration project is approximately 0.5 hectares and will include planting over 500 native trees and shrubs and over 800 wetland plants, installing basking logs to provide turtles with a place to warm up, and the ongoing management of water levels.

 

Little Brown Bat
2015/16

Once one of the most common and widespread of Canada’s 19 bat species, the little brown bat is now listed as endangered in Canada, and faces imminent extinction or extirpation. The major cause of documented mortality for little brown bats in central and eastern Canada is a deadly fungus called white-nose syndrome (WNS), which thrives in the damp, cool conditions of mines and caves. Spreading at a rate of 400 km per year, it is only a matter of time before the disease spreads to western Canada. Earth Rangers is partnering with researchers from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry to identify critical habitats little brown bats use for mating rituals and hibernation. The project will help determine effective methods for large scale bat population surveys, which can then be implemented to prevent the spread of WNS.

 

Wolverine
2015/16

The largest threats facing wolverines in northern Ontario are habitat loss and fragmentation. However, individual wolverines also face the threat of incidental trapping, which occurs when a wolverine is caught in a trap intended for other species. It is estimated that there are only 600 wolverines left in Ontario, and because wolverines reproduce at such a slow rate, the loss of every individual can have a big impact on the overall population. Earth Rangers and Wildlife Conservancy Society are collaborating with licensed registered trappers to develop new techniques to prevent the incidental trapping of wolverines. Funds raised will allow various trapping tools and techniques to be tested in the field and once best practices are established, education and outreach initiatives will be conducted among the broader trapper community.

 

Eastern Wolf
2014/15

For eastern wolves living in Ontario, habitat loss and degradation from equipment noise and pollution are major threats to survival. Their population numbers are so low that there are believed to be fewer than 1,000 eastern wolves left in Canada. Earth Rangers and Dr. Brent Patterson from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources teamed up to help eastern wolves by purchasing seven GPS satellite collars to study the wolves’ movement patterns, distribution and habitat use. This information will be used to learn more about eastern wolves in Ontario and find better ways to protect them.

 

Blanding’s Turtle
2013/14

Blanding’s turtles are losing the wild spaces they need to make their homes and what habitat remains is being divided by land and road development. To make matters worse, Blanding`s turtles are also in danger from poachers who are removing them from their homes in the wild and illegally selling them as pets. Earth Rangers and the Toronto Zoo teamed up to help protect the Blanding’s turtle. This Bring Back the Wild project supported a head-starting program at the Toronto Zoo, which raises young turtles indoors and releases them into the wild as soon as they are able to survive on their own.

 

American Badger
2012/13

Earth Rangers, the Nature Conservancy of Canada and researcher Josh Sayers helped protect the American badger in Southern Ontario by removing invasive plant species and rehabilitating grassland habitat. Through field restoration and the creation of sand ridges the project helped improve the American badgers’ ability to find food and build dens. This project also funded the placement of radio transmitters on several American badgers to better understand their movements, habitat preferences and behaviours. Over 8,000 campaigns were started by Earth Rangers members passionate about protecting the American badger, and together they supported conservation work while increasing awareness about the need for environmental protection.

 

Wood Thrush
2012/13

Dozens of species of long distance migratory songbirds in Canada have experienced chronic, long-term population declines. To help protect songbirds, Earth Rangers, the Nature Conservancy of Canada and Bridget Stutchbury and her research team worked together to protect the wood thrush by conserving habitat and supporting migratory studies. 10,000 Earth Rangers members signed up to protect the wood thrush, and the funds they raised went to help the Nature Conservancy of Canada purchase approximately 25 acres of mature deciduous forest, providing critical habitat for many species including the wood thrush. Donations to this project also purchased 60 geolocators, which were used by Bridget Stutchbury and her team to study and track wood thrush migration paths to help us learn more about how to protect their breeding and wintering grounds.

 

Spotted Turtle
2011/12

Spotted turtles are losing their habitat; wetlands are disappearing as they are drained for development and degraded by the introduction of invasive species. These small reptiles with distinctive yellow spots are also put at risk by the pet trade as poachers take them out of the wild to sell in pet stores. To help protect the spotted turtle Earth Rangers and the Nature Conservancy of Canada launched a Bring Back the Wild project to raise support for removing invasive species from wetlands as well as getting habitat designated as Provincially Significant to keep it from being developed. The location of this work has to remain secret, to protect the spotted turtles from poachers. Earth Rangers members started campaigns to help support this conservation work, and thanks to their fundraising efforts the spotted turtle has more protected habitat in Ontario.

 

Jefferson Salamander
2010/11

Jefferson salamander habitat is threatened by reckless off-roading and urban development. That’s why Earth Rangers and the Nature Conservancy of Canada built barriers and warning signs in Happy Valley Forest to prevent habitat destruction from off-roading and protect the forest. Thousands of Earth Rangers members started campaigns to protect the Jefferson salamander. Their support raised funds to help take care of this critical habitat, providing undisturbed wooded areas and tree debris for the Jefferson salamander to build its home.

 

Eastern Canada

Peregrine Falcon
2015/16

In the 1960s, the peregrine falcon population was almost decimated across Canada due to the toxic pesticide DDT. Thanks to a country wide ban on DDT and a successful recovery plan, over 1,500 peregrine falcons have been reintroduced, and breeding populations have been restored. Traditionally found near rocky cliffs and large bodies of water like the Great Lakes, some peregrines have recently adapted well to life in urban areas, making nests on the ledges of tall buildings. Although the peregrine falcon is no longer at risk of immediate extinction, habitat loss and human disturbance still pose a threat. To ensure this species’ full recovery, Earth Rangers is collaborating with FLAP Canada to promote bird-friendly building design in Toronto, and with the Nature Conservancy of Canada to monitor breeding and nesting sites in natural areas like the Alfred-Kelly Nature Reserve in southern Québec to reduce human disturbance during nesting season.

 

Bobolink
2014/15

Bobolink populations have dropped significantly throughout North America since 1968. This is largely due to the grasslands where they nest becoming land for houses or large scale farming operations. Earth Rangers and The Couchiching Conservancy took action to protect bobolinks by restoring important grassland breeding habitats, conducting surveys on populations and nests, and purchasing geolocators to study bobolink migration. This project also supported Regroupement QuebecOiseaux’s efforts to educate farmers on ways to protect bobolinks if they nest on their land.

 

Barn Swallow
2013/14

The destruction of old barns, use of pesticides and climate change are all threats affecting barn swallows. With fewer places to call home, barn swallows are slowly disappearing from our forests and woodlands. Earth Rangers and the Nature Conservancy of Canada helped protect the barn swallow by rebuilding barns and protecting land at Covey Hill and Île de Grâce, Quebec. This project also supported research conducted by Bird Studies Canada on barn swallow usage of artificial nest boxes.

 

Newfoundland Pine Marten
2011/12

Newfoundland pine martens were historically trapped for their fur; a practice that was banned in 1934. Today Newfoundland pine martens are still being accidently caught in traps and snares, set to catch other animals. Threats from the fur trade combined with habitat loss have caused Newfoundland pine marten populations to decline to 300-600. To help protect this curious and excitable mammal, Earth Rangers and the Nature Conservancy of Canada funded expeditions into the Grassy Place in Newfoundland and Labrador. This project assessed the area to develop a plan to protect the pine marten while also working to restrict trappers from accessing the Grassy Place.

 

Peregrine Falcon
2010/11

Peregrine falcons live all across the world, including coastal areas where they can hunt for their favourite meal, shorebirds. As beaches, like those found in the Upper Bay of Fundy, are increasingly disturbed by human activities, birds like the peregrine falcon face serious threats to their population. To help protect the peregrine falcon Earth Rangers and the Nature Conservancy of Canada hired Beach Rangers to parole the beach and educate visitors coming to the shorelines at New Brunswick’s Chignecto Bay. Thousands of Earth Rangers members started campaigns to protect the peregrine falcon, and their efforts helped ensure shore birds were better protected at Chignecto Bay.

 

National

Bees & Other Pollinators
2016/17

Pollinators in Canada face many challenges, including habitat loss. Expanding urbanization is also eating up the habitat of many of these creatures as exotic garden plants, lawns, and roadways replace the native vegetation necessary for pollinators’ survival. Luckily, we can help ease this pressure for both wild and managed pollinators with some strategic gardening. Earth Rangers teamed up with Pollinator Partnership Canada to develop local native plant species lists for attracting different types of pollinators, and create pollinator habitat planting guides to provide information on how to create pollinator habitat in diverse ecoregions across Canada.