Corals aren’t just warm-water creatures — they can live at crushing depths of up to 2 kilometers, in water as cold as 2⁰C. The coral reefs of Canada’s North Atlantic are some of the oldest at more than 9,000 years old. They are also home to a huge diversity of deep ocean life, including juvenile Greenland halibut, which are the most important food source for narwhals. Sadly, the survival of these unique corals is at risk due to harmful fishing practices and the warming and acidification of our oceans resulting from climate change.

Cold-water corals and sea lilies. Photo Credit: Marum

Cold-water corals and sea lilies. Photo Credit: Marum

To properly manage and conserve cold-water coral and their habitats, scientists require detailed knowledge of their biology, location, and distribution. So Earth Rangers has commissioned Arctic Fishery Alliance to do just that, conduct underwater surveys in two ecologically important sites — Qikiqtarjuaq and the Mouth of Eclipse Sound — with a remote-controlled underwater camera! This research will provide a greater understanding of the corals’ life and habitat, and serve as a first step in developing a conservation plan for this important species.

Damaged coral.

Damaged coral.

Our coral-loving members have already raised more than $74,000 for the Cold-water Coral Project. Take Earth Ranger Mya, for example, who raised $160 by walking the Gully Trail in Canso in memory of her grandpa, who loved the ocean and fishing on the Nova Scotia coast.

If a child in your life would like to help protect the cold-water coral, please visit www.earthrangers.com to register an official Earth Rangers Member!

Together, lets Bring Back the Wild!